Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Archives - Growing Your Baby
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Tag: "Sudden Infant Death Syndrome"

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Bed Sharing Greatest Risk Factor for Sleep-Related Infant Deaths, Study Says

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death of infants between one and 12 months. In fact, more than 2,000 infants die of the condition in the United States, each and every year. Though the actual “cause” is unknown, a new study now suggests that the biggest risk factor in such deaths is bed-sharing.

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Alarming Number of Parents Still Placing Babies on Sides and Stomachs to Sleep

Sudden Infant Death syndrome is the label given to infant deaths that, after an autopsy, thorough examination of the scene, and a review of the infant’s medical history, no other cause of death is found. It is the leading cause of infant death in the country (responsible for more than 2,000 infant deaths in 2010, the most recent year for which information is available).

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Researchers Make an Amazing Breakthrough in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

With the goal to educate parents regarding safe sleeping practices, the Back To Sleep campaign has reduced the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome rate by more than 50% during the last decade. However, it still remains the leading cause of death among infants, killing approximately 4,000 infants each and every year.

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IVF Births More Likely to Result in Complications, Study Says

In vitro fertilization (IVF) has helped millions of women conceive and give birth. However, there are studies that have indicated there are additional risks involved, including a higher risk of miscarriage and preterm birth. Now, a new study – said to be the largest of its kind – has been added to the previous ones, and it’s found some other risks that women considering any type of fertility assistance should be aware of.

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Study: Brain Abnormalities May Be the Reason Behind Some Sudden Infant Deaths

SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants aged one month to one year. And while it does often occur in homes where babies are placed in unsafe sleeping environments, there is still a large number of seemingly healthy babies who pass away from this mysterious syndrome every year. Now, researchers are theorizing that these babies may have differences in the brainstem chemistry from other infants that may lead to the sudden and unexpected death during sleep.

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Study: Cesarean Rates Higher among Privately Insured Patients

Cesarean sections increase healing time and risk of infection or bleeding among mothers. They are also thought to increase the risk of certain medical conditions for infants, such as breathing problems and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Yet, in many parts of the world, the rates continue to sit an all-time high.

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Researchers Say Co-Sleeping Increases SIDS Risk by Five-Fold

Co-sleeping hasn’t always been a hot topic. There once was a time when, among most cultures, bed sharing wasn’t just acceptable – it was the societal norm. Even today, there are countries in which co-sleeping is still considered the cultural norm. But in the developed world, the debate of whether or not to co-sleep is one that stirs heated conversations, both in person and on the internet.

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Sudden Infant Death Rates Continue to Decrease in England

According to the latest figures from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) in UK, the number of unexplained infant deaths has continued to fall with the figures touching an all time low in 2010, the last evaluated year. But there are still concerns that more needs to be done to reduce the number further.

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Study: Baby Sleeps Best on Mom’s Chest

Before they are born, a baby spends nine months in his mother’s womb and therefore instinctively recognizes that he is most safe close to his mom. Researchers are now pointing out that it is best for newborns to sleep with their mothers as separation from mothers leads to anxiety and stress in the infants.