C-Section Not Best Option For Breech Birth

by in Breech Birth, Caesarean section, Childbirth Video, Labor and Delivery, Labour and Delivery, Reproductive Health

According to new guidelines by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada physicians should no longer automatically opt to perform a cesarean section in the case of a breech birth.

The guidelines, which were released yesterday, are in response to new evidence that shows many women are safely able to vaginally deliver babies who enter the birth canal with the buttocks or feet first. Normally, the infant descends head first.

“Our primary purpose is to offer choice to women,” said André Lalonde, executive vice-president of the SOGC.

“More women are feeling disappointed when there is no one who is trained to assist in breech vaginal delivery,” he adds.

Since 2000, C-sections have been the preferred method of delivery in breech births. Studies suggested that breached births were associated with an increased rate of complication when performed vaginally.

As a result, many medical schools have stopped training their physicians in breech vaginal delivery.

The problem now, according to Dr. Lalonde, is that there is a serious shortage of doctors to teach and perform these deliveries.

With the release of the new guidelines, the SOGC will launch a nationwide training program to ensure that doctors will be adequately prepared to offer vaginal breech births .

New research shows there is no difference in complication rates between vaginal and cesarean section deliveries in the case of breech births.

The SOGC stresses that because of complications that may arise, many breech deliveries will still require a cesarean section.

Breech presentations occur in 3-4 per cent of pregnant women who reach term, which translates to approximately 11,000 to 14,500 breech deliveries a year in Canada.

The new decision to offer vaginal breech birth aligns with the SOGC promotion of normal childbirth – spontaneous labour, followed by a delivery that is not assisted by forceps, vacuum or cesarean section. In December of 2008, the society release a policy statement that included its recommendation for a development of national practice guidelines on normal childbirth.

“The safest way to deliver has always been the natural way,” said Dr. Lalonde.

“Vaginal birth is the preferred method of having a baby because a C-section in itself has complications.”

Cesarean sections, in which incisions are made through a mother’s abdomen and uterus to deliver the baby, can lead to increased chance of bleeding and infections and can cause further complications for pregnancies later on.

The SOGC believes that if a woman is well-prepared during pregnancy, she has the innate ability to deliver vaginally.

The national average for babies delivered via cesarean section in Canada is 25 per cent.

The causes of breech presentations are not fully known. However, a breech birth is more common :

  • In subsequent pregnancies
  • In pregnancies of multiples
  • When there is history of premature delivery
  • When the uterus has too much or too little amniotic fluid
  • In an abnormal shaped uterus or a uterus with abnormal growths, such as fibroids.
  • For women with placenta previa

Related Articles:


Tags: , , , , , , ,

About the Author

SAHM of 2 boys and founder of GrowingYourBaby.com, World Traveled Family and The World We Share. When I'm not running around after my boys, I'm looking for our next vacation spot!

Comments (1)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. burnice says:

    Oh, no, keep it up with the lack of training, idiots. Maybe more women will begin to use midwives when they see their doctors aren’t trained to assist them giving birth the way they choose.

Leave a Reply

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a Gravatar.