Tag: "clinical trials"

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UPDATE: Cleveland Clinic Reveals More Details About Uterus Transplant Recipient

2016 truly is the year for scientific and medical leaps and bounds. Last month a Cleveland Clinic revealed that they had completed it’s very first uterus transplant, something that can potentially give many women hope.

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Cleveland Clinic Performs The U.S’s First Uterus Transplant

Exciting news for women who were born without a uterus, or had to have it removed prematurely – a team of Cleveland Clinic surgeons have performed the nation’s first uterus transplant during a nine-hour surgery.

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Cleveland Clinic to Be First U.S. Hospital To Conduct Clinical Trials Of Uterus Transplants

As we’ve previously reported this year the UK approved a womb transplant program that was piloted in Sweden with successful childbirths to its credit. Now this special surgery may help infertile women in the United States as well, but with a slightly different protocol. The Swedish program uses wombs from relatives, often the recipient’s own mother. In the US – as well as the UK – the womb donors are either deceased or clinically brain dead.

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UK Approves Womb Transplant for 10 Women

doctors from the Imperial College London in the UK have been given ethical approval to start a clinical trial that will allow 10 women from the UK to receive transplanted wombs and hopefully give birth to their own babies.

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OvaScience Trials of Souped-Up IVF Procedure Placed on Hold Due to FDA Investigation

Cambridge, MA-based OvaScience recently received a letter from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) questioning the status of the company’s most advanced drug, Augment, a human cellular tissue-based product (HCT/P). Designed to help boost the success rate of in vitro fertilization, Augment injects mitochondria, the cell’s energy source, from egg precursor cells into older eggs outside the body, theoretically rejuvenating them and increasing the chances of pregnancy.

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Three Person IVF Gets Go-Ahead from HFEA

Mitochondrial disease affects about one in 200 children each year. This condition, which can greatly reduce quality of life and life expectancy of those affected, has no cure. But thanks to a recent ruling by the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA), the UK’s fertility watchdog, mitochondrial disease may eventually become a thing of the past.